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There have been many times I asked myself this question: If I survived a holocaust of some sort — like say a zombie apocalypse or a nuclear fallout — and there was only one semi-auto handgun caliber left in the world, what would that be for me? Would I pick the 9mm because there might be stockpiles of ammo left everywhere? Would I settle for the . 380 acp which, with its really low SAAMI pressure limit, shouldn’t be to difficult to build a gun for as I could just use junk metal pipes? Would I pick the 10mm for its . 41 magnum ballistics, and for the possibility of setting up a great dual-caliber system in the Glock 20 (because I could use .

Handgun Caliber Showdown Round 1: 9mm vs .357 SIG

Handgun Caliber Showdown Round 1: 9mm vs .357 SIGThere have been many times I asked myself this question: If I survived a holocaust of some sort — like say a zombie apocalypse or a nuclear fallout — and there was only one semi-auto handgun caliber left in the world, what would that be for me? Would I pick the 9mm because there might be stockpiles of ammo left everywhere? Would I settle for the .380 acp which, with its really low SAAMI pressure limit, shouldn’t be to difficult to build a gun for as I could just use junk metal pipes? Would I pick the 10mm for its .41 magnum ballistics, and for the possibility of setting up a great dual-caliber system in the Glock 20 (because I could use .40 S&W in the same gun) even if it would be next to impossible to find ammo or brass for it? Would I pick the .45 acp because I’ve always been in love with it, and that most 1911s chambered for it can be converted to the mighty .460 Rowland with just a swap of barrels and recoil springs? Or would I pick the .357 SIG because… I don’t know, maybe the holocaust would leave me a little messed up in the brain and I wouldn’t mind picking it because… aargh! I probably wouldn’t because I like the .38 Super and the 9×23 Winchester better… then again maybe I would? Maybe if I compare the most common handgun calibers two at a time and record all my thoughts, I’d be able to figure out what the answer to the above question is. Disclaimer : I do not intend to start another argument over which caliber is better — a lot of “gun experts” have been debating on these topics since Internet gun forums and message boards started becoming popular in the early 2000s, and I will not add to anyone’s pain or pleasure. This will be a very subjective comparison based on my own logic and experience, and my opinions do not reflect those of the other contributing authors of Gun News Daily. So please do not take this article too seriously. @import url("//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans:400,700&subset=latin");@import url("//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Lato:300,700,400&subset=latin");@media (min-width: 300px){[data-css="tve-u-45bd34974a1514"] { background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-05bd34974a141d"] { border: none; background-image: none !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; margin-top: 0px !important; padding: 0px !important; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-25bd34974a149a"] { background-image: none !important; background-color: rgb(242, 237, 237) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-95bd34974a1640"] { margin-top: -10px !important; background-image: none !important; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 15px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { line-height: 1.1em !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { font-family: inherit !important; color: rgb(5, 5, 5) !important; font-size: 17px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { line-height: 1em !important; }[data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] strong { font-weight: 700; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { font-family: Lato; font-weight: 400; font-size: 25px !important; color: rgb(5, 5, 5) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-75bd34974a15c8"] { padding-top: 0px !important; background-image: none !important; padding-bottom: 5px !important; text-align: center; }[data-css="tve-u-115bd34974a16b9"] { padding: 0px 0px 20px !important; background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-35bd34974a14d8"] { max-width: 760px; min-height: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] { margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] > .tcb-flex-col { padding-left: 0px; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] { border: none; border-radius: 5px; overflow: hidden; padding: 20px !important; margin-bottom: 20px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-85bd34974a1604"] { width: 85px; float: none; margin: 0px auto !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-145bd34974a1775"] { color: rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; font-size: 16px !important; font-family: "Open Sans" !important; letter-spacing: 1px; font-weight: 400 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-135bd34974a173a"] { overflow: hidden; max-width: 330px; float: none; width: 100%; background-color: rgb(241, 89, 42) !important; border-radius: 5px !important; padding-top: 5px !important; padding-bottom: 5px !important; margin-left: auto !important; margin-right: auto !important; z-index: 3; position: relative; }[data-css="tve-u-145bd34974a1775"] strong { font-weight: 700 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] strong { font-weight: 700 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] .tve-page-section-in { display: block; }}@media (max-width: 767px){[data-css="tve-u-75bd34974a15c8"] { text-align: center; background-image: none !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { font-size: 22px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-05bd34974a141d"] { background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-25bd34974a149a"] { background-image: none !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { font-size: 28px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-95bd34974a1640"] { background-image: none !important; padding-top: 10px !important; padding-bottom: 10px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] { padding-top: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-45bd34974a1514"] { background-image: none !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] { padding-bottom: 20px !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; padding-left: 10px !important; padding-right: 10px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-115bd34974a16b9"] { padding: 10px 0px !important; background-image: none !important; }} .tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h1,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h2,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h3{margin:0;padding:0}.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element p,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h1,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h2,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h3{margin:0} Get Deals on Guns and Tactical Gear Join 70,000 Readers For Our Weekly Discounts ​ GET MY DISCOUNTS Table of Contents 1 The 9mm vs. The .357 SIG 2 The 9mm’s Story 3 The .357 SIG’s Story 4 Conclusion The 9mm vs. The .357 SIG In this article I will be comparing two kinds of similar but very different handgun calibers : the 9×19 Parabellum and the .357 SIG. Both were designed for semi-automatic handguns , both use a projectile that has a diameter of 355/1000 of an inch, and with modern bullet designs, i.e. jacketed hollow points (JHPs) and jacketed soft points (JSPs) both can be great man-stoppers. Where the two differ greatly are their bullet velocities, their case dimensions and some would argue, what they can be used for. "The 9mm’s Story" Georg Luger, an Austrian sharpeye, patented a design for a pistol he so aptly named after himself in 1898 , the Luger P08. Not long after, he designed the 9×19 Parabellum cartridge that would use a .355-inch bullet — it would later supersede the then dominant but relatively smaller .309-inch bullet in the 7.65x21mm Parabellum. Looking at the 7.65x21mm’s and the 9x19mm’s ballistics performance , it’s obvious that the former is superior. I can only assume Georg was tasked to redesign the 7.65x21mm and come up with the 9x19mm because of a few possible reasons: Back in those days, hollow points for use in handguns would have been very difficult to mass-produce for war; Even if hollow points for handguns were easier to mass-produce, the Hague Convention of 1899 wouldn’t have allowed for such bullets to be used for war; The 9x19mm Parabellum Today Since its introduction in 1902, the 9x19mm Parabellum, now more commonly referred to everywhere as the 9mm, has enjoyed a well-deserved reputation. Its tapered brass that can withstand a SAAMI pressure limit of 35,000 psi (241 MPa) is quite tiny and allows for typical single-stack magazines designed for its arguably biggest rival, the .45 acp , to hold up to 22% more ammo. The high-pressure rating of the brass can also push the typical 115-grain .355 caliber projectile out of a 4.65-inch barrel with muzzle velocities of up to 1,180 feet per second. The relatively small cross-sectional surface area of the bullet (diameter) allows it to penetrate solid objects quite well . And since it’s only been popular for, well, close to a hundred years (if we consider that it only really became widely accepted after World War I), guns and ammo availability for this caliber will never be an issue . Seeing how it’s still in use today in several countries’ military and law enforcement, the 9mm would probably continue to be a popular choice for handgunners for a hundred years more , notwithstanding threats from new contenders like the wildcat .22 Tuason Craig Micromagnum (.22 TCM) and the still unnamed 7.5mm cartridge for what is arguably the most powerful semi-automatic production handgun yet, the 7.5 FK BRNO . The .357 SIG’s Story As Sylvester Stallone so eloquently put it in Rocky VI, “The world ain’t all sunshine and rainbows!” This is the sad truth, and doubly more so in the case of the .357 SIG. Elmer Keith, an Idahoan gun nut among other things, got it right when he decided to hot-load the .38 Special for use in some of Smith & Wesson’s .38-caliber revolvers built originally for the .44 S&W Special. His experiments led to Smith & Wesson developing a powerful new cartridge in 1935, capable of pushing a .357-inch 125-grain bullet out of a 4-inch barrel at speeds of at least 1,450 feet per second and producing more than double the .38 Special’s muzzle energy. The brass was made 1/8-inch longer so it wouldn’t fit inside the weaker .38 Special revolvers’ chambers to avoid catastrophic results, and in 1935 it was christened the .357 S&W Magnum. In that same year the Smith & Wesson Registered Magnum (M27) was born. The .357 magnum was so awesome that SIG Sauer, a Swiss-German firearms manufacturer, attempted to duplicate its ballistics when fired from a 4-inch barrel revolver by cutting the 10mm Auto’s case and necking it down to accept a .355-inch bullet (the same projectile for the 9mm). The new cartridge was designed to be used for semi-auto pistols because of the platform’s inherent advantages over revolvers: More ammo capacity in the semi-auto magazine vs. 6 to 8 rounds in the revolver chamber (this is true for wide-body semi-autos that use double-stack mags); No forcing cone as barrel and chamber are on the same piece of metal and work as one (velocity loss in revolvers are not present in semi-autos); Faster reloading time (because revolver speedloaders are no match for double-stack mags) ; Easier concealment by nature of semi-autos not having the “bulging” profile of the revolver’s cylinder. In 1994, it was introduced as the .357 SIG. The .357 SIG Today — A Solution To A Non-existent Problem Since its release some 23 years ago , the .357 SIG has had a small but loyal (even die-hard) fan base — “small” being the operative word. Because it didn’t really catch on as far as popularity, partly due to it being released just a few years after the .40 S&W and partly due to it not really having any practical advantages over other more established handgun calibers, ammo availability tends to be an issue in some states . Here are some other reasons why I think the round has yet to win the popularity contest: The .357 SIG pushes a 125-grain bullet out of a 4.5 inch barrel at velocities reaching up to 1,450 feet per second. This effectively duplicates factory .357 magnum loads fired from a 4-inch revolver barrel. While SIG Sauer certainly accomplished this amazing feat in a semi-auto, the .357 magnum with its longer brass can be hot-loaded to unreachable levels, e.g. Buffalo Bore’s Heavy hunting loads that can push a heavier 180-grain bullet out of a 4-inch revolver barrel at velocities of up to 1,400 feet per second. This means the .357 SIG will never be as good as the .357 magnum for hunting . Further on ballistics, the .357 SIG’s isn’t the only hard-hitting .355-inch bullet in the market. The 9mm loaded to the extremes can produce similar (albeit a little lower) bullet velocities, case in point Underwood’s 9mm LUGER +P+ which can push a 124-grain bullet out of a 5-inch barrel with velocity at the muzzle of 1,300 feet per second. The slight drawback of the 9mm +P+ having a bit of a lower velocity is mitigated by the fact that durable all-steel guns (e.g. 1911s in 9mm , and even the super-strong Norinco CZ 75 copies) are more readily available and cheaper compared to handguns chambered for the .357 SIG. Since durable steel handguns that can use 9mm +P+ loads are cheaper and more readily available, 9mm ammo are even cheaper and more readily available . Imagine being able to buy and use three different pressure loads (standard, +P and +P+) for your 9mm handgun vs. just one for your .357 SIG — would you still choose the SIG? Two other strong contenders in the .355-caliber 125-bullet weight division are the .38 Super and the 9×23 Winchester . Both use a straight brass design (the latter being a little tapered). The ancient .38 Super performs about the same as the 9mm +P+, while the newer 9×23 Winchester directly contests the .357 SIG’s ballistics performance, able to push a 125-grain bullet at 1,450 feet per second out of a 4.5-inch barrel. BUT the straight case design of these two calibers makes the cartridges ~6.2% thinner, allowing for one to two additional rounds in the mag . For comparison, a typical .40 S&W/.357 SIG 1911’s magazine can hold only 8 to 9 rounds, while a similar size 1911 mag for 9mm/.38 Super/9×23 Winchester can hold 9 to 10 rounds. Heck don’t even get me started on the newly-revived Coonan 1911-style pistol in .357 magnum. The 10mm Auto , itself the magnum-level mother cartridge of both the .40 S&W and the .357 SIG, can push a slightly heavier 135-grain bullet at a whopping 1,600 feet per second out of a 4.5-inch barrel, but its case diameter measurements are about the same as the other two’s, so as far as ammo capacity, typical 10mm 1911 single-stack mags can also hold 8 to 9 rounds. If anything, the 10mm defeats the very purpose of the .357 SIG’s existence. Since the ammo availability issue has plagued the .357 SIG’s for so long because its popularity didn’t catch on, handgunners would naturally resort to handloading. The problem is the .357 SIG also has a reputation for being hard to reload, so while a few are able to successfully reload, inexperienced reloaders end up getting frustrated and spreading even more bad news about the poor caliber. These issues have formed a vicious cycle:  ammo availability/reloading issues cause frustration which causes bad rep, which in turn diminishes demand, which then pushes suppliers to sell their stock ammo at a loss, which then results to some manufacturers limiting/stopping ammo manufacture. Conclusion If life is as easy as doing ballistics comparisons , then it would be a no-brainer to state that the .357 SIG trumps the 9mm. It can send a same-size, same-weight bullet flying at much faster velocities which results to better terminal ballistics. Even the extremely hot 9mm +P+ with the same bullet weight runs about 150 feet per second slower than just the standard .357 SIG load. Life isn’t ever going to be that easy though, and superior ballistics doesn’t necessarily mean a particular cartridge/caliber is better than another . Why, if that were the case, then I say we get rid of all types of ammo save the almighty .50 BMG, gather them and burn them all. Let’s all just get ourselves a .50 BMG rifle, gather around the bonfire with all the burning lead flying everywhere and sing Kum-ba-yah to high heavens. I’m not dismissing the .357 SIG. I think as a concept, it works great . In a perfect world where money is never going to be an issue, I’d tell anyone who asks for a recommendation to buy any handgun chambered for this round if only to give it the chance it deserves. I think the fine folks at SIG Sauer nailed it when they designed this cartridge. I love my Taurus 689 in .357 magnum. I’d love to have a subcompact semi-auto in .357 SIG. I’d love to have a Coonan in .357 magnum too. Ahhh so many guns, so little time. But I digress. So, for this handgun caliber showdown, it is with much sorrow and misery that I have to say that for all intents and purposes, the time-tested, relatively weaker but more readily available and more affordable 9mm wins over the .357 SIG . Related Reads: Best 9mm 1911 Pistols .357 Magnum Ammunition Best Compact .9mm Pistol Best Single Stack 9mm 9mm Holster 3/5 (13 Reviews) Mike Ramientas A firearms and ballistics enthusiast and an outdoorsman, Mike is one of "Gun News Daily" 's best contributing authors. He's a researcher, data analyst and writer by trade and strongly adheres to conservatism—a stalwart of the right to keep and bear arms. 40 COMMENTS Michael January 1, 2018 at 4:41 am 357 Sig is a great cartridge, but even with higher velocities and muzzle energy, it’s still a handgun and it doesn’t stop bad guys any better than the .40, 9mm or 45 ACP. If it did law enforcement agencies all over the country would’ve switched to it. Don’t get me wrong, I have a Glock 33 in 357 Sig and I love it! 357 Sig is one of my favorite cartridges, but my go to gun for EDC is my Glock 26 in 9mm. I’m pretty sure the 124 grain Federal HST’s stuffed in it will give a bad guy a real bad case of heartburn and indigestion. Not that I ever want to be in a gunfight. ? Reply Mike Ramientas January 2, 2018 at 3:02 am I’m cracking up on the heartburn/indigestion bit, lol. Thanks for the comment Michael, can’t agree more on everything you said. I think handguns being just handguns, they’ll only be great for when you need to defend yourself against a baddie in a pinch but will never be remotely as effective as rifles or shotguns. I guess this has to be the only exception (only downside is it costs an arm and a leg): https://gunnewsdaily.com/fk-brno-field-pistol-review/ Reply Michael January 4, 2018 at 5:45 pm I totally agree my friend. Handguns have always been for the immediate threat to end a confrontation with a bad guy. I read an article from a trauma surgeon and he’s seen people killed with a single .22 caliber bullet and he’s also seen guys shot with a 10mm that ran away. They also have no idea what someone has been shot with just by looking at them. Once the bullets have been removed that’s when they know. So the argument my .45 is so much bigger and better than your 9mm is not only silly, but the actual difference in diameter is 9.6 caliber, less than 1/2 the diameter of a .22 bullet. Doesn’t seem that much bigger to me. Anyway, long story short, it’s right back to “WHERE” someone is shot, not the caliber. I’m not suggesting that everyone just carry a .22, but, if it’s all you have, it beats throwing rocks. Anyway, thank you for the reply and a great article. You know as well as I do that the handgun caliber wars will continue until the Star Trek phasers come out, then it’ll start all over as to which phaser works best. ? LMAO! Stay safe and best wishes to you and my apologies for not responding sooner. Cheers! Reply Mike Ramientas January 5, 2018 at 8:04 am “…beats throwing rocks” lol brilliant! Thanks, glad you liked the article. Them phasers won’t be coming out for prolly a couple hundred years more — we’ll never see the end of the caliber wars in our lifetime 😀 Reply Amado Garcia April 29, 2018 at 6:52 pm I came across your article a little late, since we’re now at the end of April. But, nonetheless it was a brilliant piece of work. Thank you sir, for (what I think is) an honest and non biasedlook at gun calibers and their performance Vs availability. Although we all have our “comfort” caliber, I could not agree more with your assessment. You just earned your self a NEW fan. ? Reply Bob Usher January 30, 2019 at 11:05 pm If it’s good enough to guard the President, it’s good enough for me. http://www.answers.com/Q/What_gun_is_carried_by_secret_service_agents Reply Michael Truhett January 5, 2018 at 6:59 pm No question, the caliber wars will continue as long as firearms are being used. As for the phasers, you’re right where that’s concerned too. We’ll never see them, but that’s ok, my G26 will do just fine, I just pray I never have to use it. I have no interest whatsoever in being in a gunfight. I’d rather watch actors get into gunfights on tv. LOL! And before I forget, I downloaded that link you sent and I’ll read it later today. Thank you again for your messages and I’m happy I could bring a little laughter your way. Cheers! Reply Ernest H. Wilson January 25, 2018 at 1:09 am Can you shoot? That is what matters. Reply ThePersonalProtectionSpecialist February 26, 2018 at 2:27 am Not sure why the .357 Sig is being evaluated as a hunting cartridge? It was never designed for this purpose. The .357 Sig was developed to offer the best of all worlds; 1. stopping power equal to the .357 Magnum, the cartridge Evan Marshall and Ed Sanow deemed, in their book “Handgun Stooping Power”, best manstopper in actual shootings, 2. A cartridge that had less recoil than .357 Magnum 3. A cartridge that could be shot out of a gun the size of 9mm, smaller and lighter than the .45acp.357 Mag and 10mms of that period. 4. A cartridge equal to .357 Mag ballistics in guns that provide double the capacity 5. Not creating issues like early 10mm that shot guns apart becUse they used modified 9mm and .45acp guns and also did not overpenetrate like early 10mm cartridges were dling in actual shootings. The idea of having a gun the size, recoil and capacity close to 9mm with the stopping power of .357 Magnum was a very good idea. But, just as rifle cartridges that come out and are superior, sometimes far superior to 5.56mm and .308, they can rarely break into mainstream because the world is flooded with 5.56, .308 and 9mm. To say the .357 was trying to fix a non-existant problem is innacurate. It was addressing issues during that time of trying to create the best manstopper afyer yhe FBI claimed the 9mm failed in 1986. The 10mm was their second hope followed by the .40. To use the logic that 9mm is as good as the .357 Sig is the same as saying the .38 Special is as good as the .357 Magnum. The .357 Sig was desigend to address a very real problem, the problem of a non-ezistant handgun cartridge that is a very effective manstopper in all cases, conditions and situations. Reply Mike Ramientas February 26, 2018 at 3:39 am @ThePersonalProtectionSpecialist Thanks for taking the time to read the article. I’m not sure where you got your info, but when you said “The 10mm was their second hope followed by the .40.” I took it you implied that the .357 SIG came before the 10mm? If that’s the case, that is inaccurate, as the 10mm was the mother cartridge of the .40 S&W, which came before the .357 SIG. The .357 SIG was a little late in the party because when it came out, the FBI and a lot of other law enforcement agencies had already adopted the .40 S&W. “To use the logic that 9mm is as good as the .357 Sig is the same as saying the .38 Special is as good as the .357 Magnum.” I didn’t say the 9mm is as good as the .357 SIG, in fact if you’d only take a second look at my article and really try to see where I was coming from, you would likely get the impression that I was rooting for the .357 SIG in this article. It is ballistically superior to the 9mm. Unfortunately that’s the only thing it has going for it. As I also put on the list of reasons why I think it didn’t catch on, a lot of other more common calibers with similar or better ballistics are more prevalent due to better availability/ease of handloading: the .38 Super and 9×23 Winchester, some super hot 9mm +P+ loads, not to mention the 960 Rowland which, at the time of the article’s writing I haven’t heard of — is a newer wildcat more powerful than the .357 SIG as it was supposedly designed to mimic true .357 magnum performance. All these calibers rival and some even exceed the .357 SIG as far as ballistics, but these having thinner casing means there’s room for more rounds in the mag. Then there’s its sister and mother cartridges the .40 S&W and 10mm respectively, the magazines for which will fit the same number of rounds — the .40 being one of the three most common handgun calibers in the world (which the .357 SIG really should have rendered obsolete were it destined for greatness), there’s just no hope for the .357 SIG as far as popularity in the foreseeable future. To reiterate what I wrote in the Conclusion part of the article, I wish the .357 SIG gained the popularity that I think it deserves, I really do. And I have nothing against people who like the cartridge. But its biggest Achilles’ heel being it can be expensive/difficult to come by/hard to handload in my opinion makes it inferior than the readily available but ballistically weaker 9mm. Only time will tell if it would gain the kind of resurgence in popularity the 10mm is enjoying now — both of us can only hope. Reply Joe March 4, 2018 at 9:10 am Thank you for the entertaining article. It is very coincidental that I own both guns you have pictured (sig p239 in both calibers) and enjoy firing the sig 357 much more (and find myself carrying that more) but your conclusion hits the nail on the head when it comes to availability and affordability. Reply Mike Ramientas March 4, 2018 at 5:23 pm And thank you for taking the time to read through it all, Joe. Gotta love ’em SIGs. Reply Jim March 22, 2018 at 8:48 am Me personally I have thinned out my heard of 9mm pistols in favor of a few 357sig pistols. Love the caliber. I also noticed that you mentioned Underwood 9mm. They make some good 9mm loads, but they make even better 357 Sig. They advertise 1475fps, for 357sig but it chronos at 1500+ untill you put it in a Glock 33 then it comes in at advertised or slightly under. Ill keep both 9mm and 357sig cuz I like them both. The article was a nice read and had some good points. Nice work. Reply Jason March 31, 2018 at 2:58 pm I’d also point out that the 9 has less recoil and far less muzzle blast, two factors which positively lend to the most important factor, accuracy. Reply Rick Bridgman April 2, 2018 at 3:09 am I own a S&W shield in .40. I purchased a 9mm conversion barrel for it for ammo prices sake. The company I purchased from also had a .357sig barrel. I was just wandering if the .357sig load would be of much use in the short barrel of the Shield pistol? Reply Mike Ramientas April 5, 2018 at 12:12 am Rick, What’s the barrel length on your S&W Shield? I’ve been looking a lot at Smith & Wesson’s website lately and I believe they have subcompact (~3-inch), compact and full-size Shield models. Whether or not it’ll be worth getting the conversion barrel depends on the barrel length of your particular Shield model. If you look at this link http://www.ballisticsbytheinch.com/357sig.html you’ll see that there’s around ~200 fps difference in muzzle velocities when firing any of the specified .357 SIG loads from a 3-inch and a 5-inch. If your Shield is a 3-inch I would say just get a different pistol that has a 4-inch or a 5-inch barrel if you want to maximize your gains (because unless it’s just for novelty’s sake I simply don’t see any practical reason to get a .357 SIG conversion for a 3-inch barrel when you already have the gun chambered for .40 S&W). I would recommend getting a Glock 23 and getting a .357 SIG conversion or better yet, get a Glock 32 and don’t bother converting it to .40 S&W. But if your Shield is a 4-inch then it might be worth trying. IIRC the .357 SIG was designed to be fired from barrels around 4 inches in length or longer — though it’s still faster than any 9mm load I know when fired from a 3-inch, I really don’t see the point. And shorter barrel = bigger muzzle blast, even worse than what Jason above has touched on in his comment. I imagine it’ll have more felt recoil too. But it’s really up to you. Reply Amado Garcia April 29, 2018 at 7:02 pm I came across your article a little late, since we’re now at the end of April. But, nonetheless it was a brilliant piece of work. Thank you sir, for (what I think is) an honest and non biasedlook at gun calibers and their performance Vs availability. Although we all have our “comfort” caliber, I could not agree more with your assessment. You just earned your self a NEW fan. ? Reply Mike Ramientas May 1, 2018 at 6:38 pm @Amado Garcia, thank you for the kind words. Your comment made my day. Please do check out my other articles here at GND. 🙂 Reply Damian July 27, 2018 at 1:41 am Nice article. I like that u attempt to prevent the continuation of the never ending caliber wars. To each their own. I have one problem though and I see it in almost every pro/con evaluation of the .357 sig. Lack of ammo availability? Maybe at some local gunstores. I’ve had zero issues locating HSTs, Gold Dots, various brands of FMJ, reloads, etc. either online or at gunshows here in gun friendliest state in the nation – California! Anyhow, I love the 357 sig and hope to see it climb in popularity. Thanks for your input. Reply Mike Ramientas July 27, 2018 at 2:52 am Damian, thanks for reading the article. If availability weren’t as much of a problem in a lot of other states, this comparison would really be a no-brainer, the .357 SIG would win hands down. Unfortunately, it is. And the main issue with buying stuff online is, well, cost. Anyone would be hard-pressed to find .357 SIG ammo as cheap as 9mm online. There are folks who have no issues forking out a couple more bucks and us cheapskates can only envy them. Yep, to each their own. Reply G Norm September 10, 2018 at 2:39 pm I’d like to point out that the 357sig’s case shape also adds to reliability since it is a bottle necked case. I don’t see this point in most discrediting articles for the cartridge. As for ammo availability, I’ve got about 1800 to 2000 rounds of it and never had an issue finding it here in Texas. If bullet diameter, ammo availability and mag capacity were the main deciding points, then why not 9×18 or .380? I’d argue that these lack power, which is what 357sig does best. 38 super is also a great round, but I’ve only shot it and never owned one. My first 357 sig purchase was a LEO trade in Glock 31 that I still own. Since then, I’ve acquired a P239(for carry) and a P229(for my wife.) I’ve had a few others that I didn’t keep, because I didn’t care for the gun itself. My point is that I trust the cartridge, it does what 9mm does, but better, minus a little recoil and mag capacity. To me, if the shoe fits, wear it. Reply Mike Ramientas September 10, 2018 at 4:55 pm G Norm, It’s people like you that make me think the .357 SIG will never die. I can only hope its popularity catches on in the not so distant future — it deserves more. Thanks for reading. -Mike Reply Dan Nolan September 14, 2018 at 6:37 pm I’ve been a few shootouts over 30 years as a cop. The first was the 10mm Glock 20 and it did the job. The bean counters had a hissy over the cost of 10mm and convinced command to go to .45 Glock 21SF with Golden Sabres and a +P. We discussed the .357 Sig but yet again, too costly on the Ammo. Budget always controls preferences in the field. Most agencies in our areas had the Glock 22 / .40 so we were told to accept the .45+p .357 Sig was out of the running. Thumbnail: shootout with a Meth Head blasting us, he was hit 9 times within 12-15 feet, both lungs punched out, one hit through the neck severing his carotid artery and he ran like a zombie in WW 3 MOVIE. Final shot was into his spine , severing it by one of my detectives as he collapsed and rolled due to his momentum. Point being…no matter what you carry, today’s druggies are jacked up and don’t drop like in the movies. Our practice of head shots became a training focus afterwards whereas before we were trained center mass. Reply Jay Hopkins September 26, 2018 at 4:20 am I’m one of the odd ones out. I’ve been a Armed Security patrol officer for over a decade, carried everything from Sig p220s, 226s, 229s, Hk USPs, M9s, old steel 3rd gen Smith’s and every caliber from 9mm to .45ACP including the failed .45GAP. I currently carry a p229 chambered in .357 sig. I have. 40s&w and 9mm barrels for the weapon, but one small fact keeps me on the 357. Barrier penetration. The odds of myself having to fire on, more so through a car door or windshield , vs the average person is pretty large. Trajectories change a lot on glass, and with the supports inside a car door, 9mm and .40 can be stopped dead in its tracks. Now we all know an extra 200-300fps can flatten the trajectory of a round through glass, it can also give the extra umph needed to punch through a pesky folded steel door support. Also working outdoors in the woods of Maine, it has its merits against…larger wildlife that a 9mm, .40 or .45 would just piss off due to less penetration. Is it more expensive? Heck yes. $30-40 for 50 rounds of FMJ and astronomical prices for HPJ. Is ammo readily available?. Well not so much at the LGS, but the internet and places like SGammo make it easily purchased via the mail guy. Where I work I am not allowed to carry a 686-2 so….the hardest hitting “duty caliber” round I can have is the .357SiG…..and honestly. Thays just fine with me. Plus the fireballs it makes at twilight hours is a bonus :p Reply Mike Ramientas September 26, 2018 at 10:05 pm Jay, Thanks for reading through the article. I wish there could be more odd ones like yourself — then maybe the .357 SIG would get the popularity it deserves. If you’re working outdoors and you feel at one point that you need a more powerful weapon for big two-legged critters, there’s a good chance you can convert your .45 ACP handgun to a 10mm, a .45 Super or even a .460 Rowland (depending on brand/model) — handgun calibers that are much more powerful. I think carrying typical 125-grain .357 SIG loads is pushing it — I can be wrong as I’ve never had to shoot a bear before, but in such scenarios it’s better to err on the safe side. As far as the barrier/glass penetration bit and all other things you mentioned, I can’t agree more. All the best, Mike Reply Ed September 30, 2018 at 6:50 pm Hi, I am just an average guy with a CHL. After research I determined that if I ever had to defend myself I would want the upper hand. Where as my Glock 19 was the equalizer, the Glock 32 that I have made my EDC gives me more comfort. As to ammo availability, it is readily available at $15-16 a box of 50 on line. The 19 being the same size and feel as the 32 is still used for high volume range time. Reply Mike Ramientas October 1, 2018 at 3:33 am Ed, thanks for reading the article. It’s a good thing you purchased both and found a purpose for each of them. Reply Ed September 30, 2018 at 7:12 pm Hi, I am just an average guy with a CHL. After research I determined that if I ever had to defend myself I would want the upper hand. Whereas my Glock 19 was the equalizer, the Glock 32 that I have made my EDC gives me more comfort. As to ammo availability, it is readily available at $15-16 a box of 50 on line. The 19 being the same size and feel as the 32 is still used for high volume range time. Reply CM Garcia November 15, 2018 at 6:22 pm Nice article, nice effort. I’m another one that sides with the .357Sig. I have both….carry both at times because for me I interpreted the creation of the .357Sig for a specialized reason. While the .357Sig is by far my most enjoyed round to shoot I only carry it when I travel in the car, meaning road trips. I don’t EDC everyday but when I do it’s a 9mm. For me the .357Sig advantage was always vehicle penetration. This is what I understood it’s purpose was to overcome and that’s what it excels at. If I were in need of shooting thru my door while inside my vehicle I trust it would be more effective than a 9mm. For all other purposes the 9mm wins due to comfort and ease of carry. It’s simply easier. Reply KenF April 20, 2019 at 10:49 pm Not sure if you’re still monitoring this discussion any longer but regardless, I think this is a good comparison article except for one point. I believe the 9mm is the best carry caliber for most folk because, just as the FBI report stated, most are too recoil sensitive for anything more powerful (from 10mm to 40 Cal to 9mm). I purchased a G31 to replace the 357 Mag I used as a truck/woods gun and would point out that my 357 Sig plinking loaf is 1350 FPS while my self defense loads hits 1380 FPS. If I want a “+P” 357 Sig I can purchase Underwood’s loading of Gold Dot which hits 1510 FPS. If it were true that 9mm +P rounds achieved the velocity reached by the 357 Sig, I wouldn’t have considered purchasing the G31. So, yeah, the 9mm +P velocity is comparable to 357 Sig or Mag but only when comparing it to the most anemic 357 loading you can find. If we follow this type of reasoning to its logical conclusion, that the extra 100 to 400 FPS really doesn’t matter, then I could make the argument that 9mm isn’t needed because we have the 380. And the G42 is smaller and lighter than the G19 so why bother; right? It is nonsensical to say that 9mm is “much better” than 380 and then make the argument that 9mm is “just as good” as 357 Sig or Mag. They are all 35 caliber but the difference is muzzle velocity and only muzzle velocity. So, is more muzzle velocity better or is it not? Anyway, I will be purchasing a 40 cal and a Lone Wolf 9mm conversion barrel for my G31. It’s just too easy. Reply Dean C. April 24, 2019 at 4:15 pm I think the phrase “second hope” with regards to the FBI was their move away from .45 ACP. They took the 9mm cookie to replace the .45 ACP to be in step with everyone else going 9mm for compatibility conformance. After they got their asses beat in a gunfight in 1986, due mostly to poor operator performance, they dropped the 9mm like a hot potato and restarted their search for a better operational bullet. They looked at the 10mm and accepted a bullet redesigned as the .40 S&W. Hence, the 9mm was their “first hope” for a superior man-stopper bullet, and the 10mm became the “second hope”. Reply Mzondo May 12, 2019 at 7:23 pm I’ve spoken with many Ex LEO and a few Ex FBI agents at gun shows and every one of them said the same thing the only reason the 9mm was chosen by the FBI and LEO was not because the 9mm was a better because they even said it wasn’t, it was because there agents and officers were only hitting their targets less than 30 percent or less of the time (look up the report) which they the LEO and agents blamed on recoil of 40SW and 357Sig and with the 9mm you got less recoil for faster follow up shots and 2+ extra rounds yet know the standard FBI and LEO 9mm round is now a +p or a +p+ round which know that so called recoil that they blamed on the 40sw and 357sig is worse with the 9MM then it was with the 40SW and 357SIG. So rather than offering better training for their officers and agents (which they do need) with the 40SW and 357 sig both which they all said was a much better and more powerful round at taking down people especially the 357 sig when loaded to where it originally was supposed to be (which originally was 1,450 + feet per second) for a 125 GR bullet and it still out performs any 9mm +p or +P+ round) and even after being watered down by ammo companies to 1350-1375 the 357 sig still out performed any 9mm +p and +P+ round that they the FBI and LEO had and they still opted to go with the less powerful 9mm which is under gunning there officers to a less lethal round. And for all the people who keep saying with today’s new bullet technology and new powders the 9MM is now better and faster, well guess what that same bullet technology and new powders also went into making the 40 SW, 357SIG and the 45ACP also a better round. Just look at how now there a making 45acp + p rounds and 40SW rounds going 50-75 FPS faster and that’s something that was never heard of ten years ago. Please watch the following 2 videos below in their entirety and just maybe if you can put politics aside you will understand how the 9mm though a good round and can get the job done in most cases is not the perfect defense round that people want it to be. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LTTDgZZZFa0 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U4DsaBrohV0 Reply Mike Ramientas July 20, 2019 at 4:13 pm I never once said the 9mm is perfect. Lol. If you read the entirety of my article (I’m assuming you didn’t — otherwise you wouldn’t have taken too much time typing your long anti-9mm rhetoric), you’ll know that I don’t like the 9mm. It just so happened that of the two, the 9mm is more accessible and more available because of better pricing and worldwide popularity, not to mention I’d personally choose the 9×23 Winchester (or even the .38 Super) over the .357 SIG — same power, more ammo in the mag. Reply JD Donham July 26, 2019 at 7:50 pm Show me a mid sized gun that can chamber a 38 super or 9×23, the 20111’s STI style guns are HUGE. You need a oal of 1.2 in for those to be at there peak power. this leaves guns like the 10mm glock 20’s, they are bigger, breach face is still 40/357/10mm brass sized, too large for extraction 100% of the time, mag lips are an issue. Reply Mike Ramientas August 7, 2019 at 2:05 pm @JD Donham It shouldn’t be too difficult to find a 4-inch barrel 1911 chambered in .38 Super. It’ll only be a matter of whether the owner would be okay with reaming the barrel’s chamber to accept 9×23 Winchester or just sticking with .38 Super. Here’s a quick link I found from Google: https://www.turners.com/kimber/kimber-pro-carry-hd-ii-38-supe-5612 And don’t even get me started on the 960 Rowland. I haven’t updated this article in a while but maybe I will soon. Reply CJ October 23, 2019 at 9:31 am My background is a swat police officer in a major US city for clarification. We recently went back to 9mm from .40 and everyone prefers the 9mm. Why? Control and accuracy. Follow up shots are so easy and their are plenty of times we have to shot one handed due to carrying shields or entry tools. Our handguns are our secondary weapons not our primary. That’s why we used .40 cal before. That said I carry 9mm and .357 sig off duty. A lot has to do with where I’m going and doing. Colder weather or woods carry it’s always a .357 sig. It is a no joke round with not only great terminal ballistics but incredible feeding reliability due to the bottleneck design. Everyone says the .357 sig is a 9mm on steroids. I always looked at it as a slightly watered down .357 mag. Again, for 3 seasons in urban areas I carry one of my 9mm but the .357 sig absolutely has a place in the gun world especially where power, accuracy and penetration come into play. 6 rounds of .357 mag or 16 of .357 sig? Why is that even a question? Reply GaShooter November 5, 2019 at 7:34 pm I’m another latecomer to the article/party. I’m an old fart retired physician who spent a lot of time working with trauma services during my residency days. That was back in the old days way before 10mm, 40S&W and 357SIG were developed and I was involved in taking care of shootout victims usually in “drug deals gone bad” – AKA victims of LEO including State Patrol, DEA, etc. It wasn’t uncommon to dig out bullets varying in power including 357 Mag, 45ACP 44 Mag and a few 9mm. It was incredible that many of these folks survived 4 bullets to the chest but they did. To be honest, there wasn’t any significant observable differences in the damage done. That being said, I personally choose 357 Sig over 40S&W because it shoots flatter which means more accuracy for me. Nearly all my carry guns have fixed sights and at 15-20 yard targets, the 40 cal bullets drop up to an inch lower than the 357 Sig rounds. That’s what matters most for me. Reply Kaitlyn Kellerman November 28, 2019 at 3:25 am I’ve been hunting for a place such as this for quite a long moment. Reply Canhammer April 29, 2020 at 5:05 pm ThePersonalProtectionSpecialist is correct in all he said. As a retired Federal Agent who worked in three different agencies, all of them as a collateral FI, and retiring as a Division FI, the .357 did all it was intended to do and outclassed the 9, 40 and 45. I attended an industry shoot in Las Vegas about 10 years ago and was the only carrier of a 357 SIG (my agency, and many more, despite what you’ve heard DID adopt the 357 SIG because it is a bad a$$ round). We chronied our guns (mine was SIG P229, 3.9″ Bbl 125gr at 1365 FPS) then took turns at shooting a ballistic dummy wearing body armor. Before the first round of testing everyone wanted to see the 45 go first, then the 40 then the 9 then me. After the first round of tests everybody wanted me to go first because the force and cavitation shown by the dummy when shot by the 357 SIG was noticeably greater then all the other calibers. I’m one of those guys that carriers a different gun and caliber every week just for fun, but if I’m going to a bad part of town or on a trip, it’s the 357 SIG for all the reasons ThePersonalProtectionSpecialist mentioned. Also you assumed some thing he didn’t infer, nothing in his remark indicates he thought the 357 SIG came before the 40. Reply Cole May 3, 2020 at 9:34 pm Tardy to the party but I’ll toss in my 2 cents. There are pros and cons to both cartridges, as well as the .40 S&W, the .45 ACP, the 10mm, the .38 super, etc. However, as I sit here In the twilight of the COVID-19 threat. I’m sure all of you (and maybe a few of you participated too) had noticed that 9mm rounds were being gobbled up like tiny white marbles in a frantic game of hungry hungry hippos. This meant that most popular and cheapest of rounds was unavailable not only at your local gun shops and big box stores, but even online. 😮 So what was still available? Scant amounts of .40S&W, .45 ACP, and a relatively available amount of the obscure and much maligned .357 SIG. Which, in turn, led to an increase in sales of guns and barrels chambered for that round. COVID-19 showed us that a sudden spike in demand for even the most mainstream and mass-produced types of cartridges, is still all it takes to create a shortage of said cartridge. If you ask me, the sad, unfortunate, story leading to the inevitable demise of the .357 SIG came just a little too prematurely. Reply LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply

Photo Friday: Winchester Model 94 (pre-64)

Photo Friday: Winchester Model 94 (pre-64)

The .32 Winchester Special (left) as compared to the 5.56 NATO (right) round. One of my favorite firearms is a rifle bequeathed to me by my grandparents that was originally purchased as a hunting rifle by my late great grandfather. I cherish it for the sentimental value it holds, but it’s also a great shooter and always a pleasure to take to the range. The rifle I’m referencing, pictured here, is a lovely lever-action, the Winchester Model ’94. My great grandfather originally purchased the rifle in 1954. He originally intended to use it (and did—often) as a hunting rifle, and decided the .32 Winchester Special model would suit him best. Now that the Winchester is in my possession, I don’t take it out to hunt quite like my great grandad did, exactly, but I do still enjoy the pop of the .32 Win Special cartridge. As it turns out, it’s a great round for dispatching dinos (to see what I mean, check out the vid embedded above). My great grandad’s favorite lever action, the "Winchester Model ’94" (pre-’64) still packs a wallop.

Sightmark ReadyFire LW-R5: Handgun Red Laser Sight

Sightmark ReadyFire LW-R5: Handgun Red Laser Sight

The Sightmark ReadyFire LW-R5 Red Laser Sight (SM25007), a laser sight designed for full-sized pistols, is ready to put your handgun on target. When you need a perfectly placed aim, the ReadyFire LW-R5 stands ready to help you Make Your Mark with a red laser extending 20 yards during the day and an impressive 300 yards at night. Photo courtesy of SightMark The laser easily mounts between the trigger guard and muzzle of any picatinny/weaver-railed, full-size handgun, instantly turning the common pistol into a tactical, defense-ready sidearm. The 5mW ReadyFire LW-R5 is powered by two AG13 batteries, allowing up to 7 hours of continuous use, keeping it primed for any close-combat situation, and weighs only 2.3 ounces so no significant weight is added to your setup. Photo courtesy of Sightmark The user-friendly Sightmark ReadyFire LW-R5 features a slide switch activation and a durable shockproof design, making it the laser of choice for almost any intense shooting scenario. About Sightmark® Sightmark manufactures award-winning products including riflescopes, gun sights, laser sights, night vision, flashlights, bore sights and other cutting edge, premium shooting accessories. Inspired by military and law enforcement technology, Sightmark products are designed for competition, shooting, home defense, personal safety and other tactical applications, as well as hunting. For more information about Sightmark products, visit www.sightmark.com . For media requests related to Sightmark, please email mediarelations@sightmark.com . Photos courtesy of SightMark

Springfield Armorys new SAINT AR-15 rifle at SHOT

Springfield Armorys new SAINT AR-15 rifle at SHOT

Springfield Armory® is proud to announce an array of new firearms for the free and independent at the 2017 SHOT Show. The new guns, anchored by Springfield Armory®’s new SAINT™ AR-15 rifle, represent the company’s commitment to enabling law-abiding citizens to protect themselves and their loved ones. While the new guns are equally at home on the recreational and competitive ranges, they’re all designed for serious defensive use should the need arise. “We’re committed to protecting Springfield Armory®’s storied legacy,” stated the company’s CEO, Dennis Reese. “The way we do that each and every day is to design and build the very best products we can to help our customers protect their legacies. It’s an incredible responsibility that drives us, and we’re very proud to bring these new products to market.” The Springfield Armory® SAINT™ is the company’s groundbreaking entry into the AR-15 market and redefines what an AR-15 should be. While equally at home on plinking and competition ranges, the SAINT™ is built for defense and packs features valued by warriors into a carbine with a price point at a fraction of what one would expect. With an MSRP of just $899, the SAINT™ brings affordable reliability to the market. The SAINT™ is an optics ready flat-top design that includes an A2-style front sight and gas block. Aircraft-grade aluminum upper and lower receivers are joined using Springfield Armory®’s Accu-Tite™ system to lock upper and lower receivers into a shake-free system. The SAINT™ features a 16-inch Chrome Moly Vanadium barrel with a 1:8 twist rate and 5.56mm NATO chamber. Micro-polished, Nickel Boron trigger components provide a smooth and crisp break with mil-spec pull weight. Out of the box, the SAINT™ includes upgraded stock, grip, and handguard components. The Bravo Company PKMT two-piece handguard features KeyMod-compatible attachment points at the eleven, one, and six o’clock positions for accessories. The handguard covers an internal aluminum heat shield yet remains slim for easy handling. "The Bravo Company" BCM Gunfighter stock offers a generous cheek weld comb, rubber butt pad, and QD and slotted sling attachment points. The Bravo Company Mod 0 Pistol grip provides grip-enhancing texture and a vertical orientation designed to complement the modern combat stance. A flip-up rear sight serves as a backup to optics or as the primary sighting system. The SAINT™ and all five new handguns will be displayed at the 2017 Shooting, Hunting, and Outdoors Trade (SHOT) Show the week of January 16, 2017, and are available for order immediately. About Springfield Armory® “The First Name in American Firearms,” Springfield Armory® was founded in 1777, when George Washington ordered the creation of an armory to store ammunition and gun carriages during the American Revolution. In 1794, the armory began to manufacture muskets and spent the next 150 years supplying firearms for every major American conflict. The original armory closed in 1968. In 1974, the Reese family took ownership of the Springfield Armory® name and began making the M1A™ rifle. Today, Springfield Armory® develops many products loyal to the company’s heritage, like the 1911 pistol, while ensuring its future with innovative products, including the XD®, XD® Mod.2®, XD(M)® and XD-S® polymer pistols and now the new SAINT™ AR-15 rifle.

M1951 Fishtail Parka Review for 2020: Survival Gear

I apologize now for the madness you are about to enter into if you read this review.  My madness started about 30 years ago when I first received a fishtail parka from a fellow Army Reservist in trade for some boots.  The parka looked like a warm coat and I had some extra boots, why not.   I wore that coat in the coldest, windiest, most miserable conditions Mother Nature could dish out for Colorado.  It never let me down. I even used it when slept on the ground, against a tree, a friends floor, it was my blankie. Quick Navigation The M1951 Fishtail Parka Review The Korean War Survival Applications The "M1951 Fishtail Parka" Review I didn’t even know what it was called for about a year, until a good friend tried to pry it from my grip.  He looked at me and called it a M1951 Fishtail Parka .  I loved that coat, finally it wound up hanging in my closet to be worn on camping trips and the like.  One day my brother said he needed a winter coat and having a closet full of coats I handed it to him and said, ‘Take care of it and if you don’t want it anymore, give it back!’ He had it for about 10 years, he passed away last year and his wife returned it to me, it meant a lot and she knew it.  The past couple of years my madness has grown and the return of this unique coat was even more meaningful, as you are about to learn. Rothco M-51 Fishtail Parka, Olive Drab, L Button in quilted polyester liner in olive drab. Snap up back flap and button adjustable cuffs. See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 08:58 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API The Korean War The M1951 Fishtail Parka was originally developed for our soldiers on the Korean Peninsula where winters can be brutal.  It needed to be large enough to wear over a uniform and anything else that a soldier might be wearing or carrying.  The original concept coat was designated M1948, they are rare and were made of the best materials available, not many were made due to the high cost.  The M1951 Fishtail Parka saw some different materials being used, but were still expensive and heavy.  They were made up until the mid to late fifties and were copied by some other countries.  In 1965 they were brought back and called, get ready, the M1951 Fishtail Parka .  I am not sure how long they were manufactured.  During the first Gulf War a new version was produced in a Night Camo pattern, the idea was that it was supposed to mask the troops from older night vision optics, it did not, but it was a good piece of gear never-the-less.  You can find pure white snow versions also. So the differences in years of models is basically this, the M1951 Fishtail Parka has an attached hood and shoulder epaulets to stuff your gloves or other gear into.  It has a button in liner that was made of alpaca or other wool or even a synthetic pile I have heard about but have never seen.  It could have a button in hood liner also with fur trim. The cuffs have big buttons with elastic as well.  The zipper is your standard Talon, self sharpening, unit.  I say self sharpening due to the fact that if your get something caught in it, it just might shear it off, they are the best.  The pockets, two slash style, are wool lined and have snap closures as does the front.  Sizing is larger than any civilian sizes, remember they are made to go over your other layers.  Material is 80/20  cotton and nylon.   IMHO these are the best of the lot, because of the attached hood and they just look good. The M65 had no attached hood, but a separate unit can be buttoned on, and it came with a quilted button in liner. The hoods for this coat that I have seen are wool insulated with a hideous white fake fur trim,  I removed the trim from my hood.  The hood can be sewn on for a better look and less wind infiltration.  There is also a wire brim on these hoods to conform to whatever you may be wearing.  Up until now the hoods were large enough to fit over a helmet.  These models have 2 large slash pockets lined with wool.  These models are sized large, meaning a full size bigger than what you would expect from the military.  The cuffs have a large button and elastic straps.  Talon zipper with snap front, 50/50 cotton nylon construction.  I have seen some that were 80/20 like the M51’s and some older versions with attached hoods. Rothco M-51 Fishtail Parka, Olive Drab, L Button in quilted polyester liner in olive drab. Snap up back flap and button adjustable cuffs. See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 08:58 / Affiliate links / Images from "Amazon Product Advertising" API The Desert Night Camo models are a little different.  They have an attached hood, 2 slash pass-thru pockets, and the hood is smaller than a helmet sized unit.  More like any standard hood would fit, but still large in nature.  The sizing is smaller too, I would say a full size different than the previous models, but still voluminous.   The liners for this are quilted nylon/polyester and have pass thru slots, no pockets on this model and no zipper, button front only.  The cuffs have elastic with no buttons.  The pattern is not too aggressive in nature and really doesn’t stand out in a crowd like most camo patterns.  These are 50/50 cotton and nylon.   I plan on doing an over-spray of Moss Green on one to see if I can make it look older and dirtier, going for a hobo look. The Snow Parkas are just overcoats, no pockets and no liner to button in.  They are great for fitting over your normal winter clothing with pass thru slots to get to your gear underneath.  These fit a size smaller like the Desert version , more like a regular military size, but once again, big by civilian standards.  These are 100 nylon, so very waterproof. So, except for the snow version, these are not water tight coats.  If you are stuck in a sleet storm or very rainy cold conditions these coats will soak up the water, put on your poncho.  They can be sprayed down with water repellant with some success, but with that coating comes a more flammable unit.  Everything is a trade-off.  The older liners made of wool were heavy and when they got wet, even heavier and took a while to dry.  I say stick to the newer quilted units and save any wool liners you have to sell for big money or for those days spent re-enacting M.A.S.H. scenes .  M51 and M65 liners are all interchangeable, the Night Camo units are item specific.  I hope I covered all the differences, if I missed something, sound off. Survival Applications So why are we talking about these coats?  Glad you asked.  They are durable, light for their size and coverage, and can be easily modified to hold more gear.  The fabric is so strong you can sew extra pouches inside for gear.  I heard of one person who sewed a large survival vest into one to create a cold weather survival smock.  They don’t really look like some tactical piece, so you won’t stick out in a crowd.  I can wear mine in 50 degree weather on a hike, keep it opened up and not over heat, but when the clouds come in and the wind picks up, zip up and be toasty.  Granted I live in a dry clime and don’t have many humidity issues.  When camping or just enjoying the cool fall evenings, when you wrap up in one of these, it feels comforting and makes you want to stay out a little longer. There are some great companies out there making some very versatile greatcoats, most are expensive, correct that, I haven’t seen a cheap one.  Some can double as a sleeping bag .  Others resemble an M-65 Field Jacket with lots of pockets, very neat stuff from a gear head’s perspective, but again be willing to shell out the dollars.  If you have ever thought about a great coat/over coat as a viable option, but couldn’t pull the trigger because of price, you owe it to yourself to do a little research on this military option.  If you are handy with a needle and thread, this coat is only limited by your imagination. Inventory of these are getting tighter.  M51’s are commanding top dollar, especially if they have the original liner and hood liner.  M65’s are cheaper, but starting to climb too.  The Desert version is still very affordable.  The ones I have purchased are advertised as used, but appear to be just dusty.  The Snow Camo ones are also very affordable and I believe you should all get one, if nothing else for playing a game of hide and seek with the kids in the snow.  Bottom line, Fishtail Parka’s are a great coat with lots of survival applications! Rothco M-51 Fishtail Parka, Olive Drab, L Button in quilted polyester liner in olive drab. Snap up back flap and button adjustable cuffs. See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 08:58 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API Photos By: Pineslayer, WWII Archives Other interesting articles: Monovault Survival Gear Review for 2020 The Parry Blade: "Survival Gear Review" for 2020 Primal Gear Unlimited Survival Bow Review for 2020 The Magpul Bipod: Survival Gear Review for 2020

{ TOP 10 } Best Womens Hiking Boots July 2020 Updated Reviews

“Watch over your feet, and the rest will take care itself” is a hymn in the British military, and for an upright reason – if your feet are relaxed, warm and dry you’ll feel much more contented going the distance on treks and open-air quests. Hiking boots for women are crucial to your ease and action on the track, but this no longer means a stiff and strong model that will weigh you down. The leaning is toward lighter resources that still provide good care, and waterproof boots are the most widespread by far. In this article, we list out ten of the best women’s hiking boots or women’s walking boots. This ought to provide you with plenty of choices if you’re in the marketplace for a new pair of boots for the track. We preserve the descriptions sufficiently brief to try and deliver a rapid but concise impression, along with the main pros, cons and best usages. There’s an enormous variety of selections on the marketplace when you are looking for best women’s hiking boots or best walking boots, and the major choice is determining whether to go after leather or fabric boots. The leather is logically water-resistant but can be harder and weightier and takes some time to break in and mould securely to your feet. On the other hand, fabric boots lean towards to be lighter and can sense more like wearing contented trainers straight out of the box but tend to be less sturdy and less warm. What You Will Get Here Best Women’s Hiking Boots To Consider Buying: "Best Women’s Hiking" Boots Comparison Chart (Updated 2020) Ahnu sugarpine hiking boot Clorts Women's Hiker Leather Waterproof Hiking Boot Danner Women's Mountain Light Cascade Hiking Boot Dr comfort hiking boots Merrell Moab FST "Waterproof Hiking Boot" Merrell Women's Moab 2 Vent Mid Hiking Boot Merrell Women's Siren Edge Hiker Mishmi Takin Waterproof Hiking Boot Nevados Women's Klondike Waterproof Hiking Boot The First Outdoor Women's Waterproof Hiking Boots What To Know Before Buying The Product? How to Use and Maintain the Product? Final Verdict Best Women’s Hiking Boots To Consider Buying: Finding the ideal fit is crucial, but elegance, sturdiness, heat, mass, and even water resistance are all thoughtful considerations. Low-cut items with stretchy midsoles are outstanding for day hiking. Some lightweight travelers may even pick trail-running boots for long-distance trips. Moreover, Full-grain leather provides remarkable sturdiness and scratch confrontation and very decent water resistance yet it’s the exclusive ones. When you transport weightier loads on long journeys deep into the backcountry. Most of the people will have a high cut that hush-up above the ankles for exceptional sustenance. Sturdy and helpful, with firmer midsoles than lighter boots, they are best women’s hiking boots for on- or off-trail tour. Use our complete buyer guide to choose which one is perfect for you. Best Women’s Hiking "Boots Comparison Chart" (Updated 2020) Product Name Read Review Price 1st Ahnu sugarpine hiking boot Read Full Review "Read Full Review" Check Price 2nd Clorts Women's Hiker Leather Waterproof Hiking Boot Read Full Review Read Full Review Check Price 3rd Danner Women's "Mountain Light Cascade" Hiking Boot Read Full Review Read Full Review Check Price 4th Dr comfort hiking boots Read Full Review Read Full Review Check Price 5th Merrell Moab FST Waterproof Hiking Boot Read Full Review Best Women’s Hiking Check Price 6th Merrell Women's Moab 2 Vent "Mid Hiking Boot" Best Women’s Hiking Best Women’s Hiking Check Price 7th Merrell Women's "Siren Edge Hiker" Best Women’s Hiking Best Women’s Hiking Check Price 8th Mishmi Takin Waterproof Hiking Boot Women’s Hiking Boots "Women’s Hiking Boots" Check Price 9th Nevados Women's Klondike Waterproof Hiking Boot Women’s Hiking Boots Women’s Hiking Boots Check Price 10th "The First Outdoor" Women's Women’s Hiking Bootss Women’s Hiking Boots Women’s Hiking Boots Check Price 1 Ahnu sugarpine hiking boot Editor Rating : 4.5 out of 5 star Check Price on Amazon! If you are directing the eyes for the best waterproof hiking boots, then Ahnu is an exceptional boot corporation that delivers good hiking shoes that are sturdy and rough, with exceptional eminence. With lots of knowledge under their belt, Ahnu has built a brand name by reliably delivering top-class products. Ahnu  Sugarpine Hiking boots for women are, of course, intended for females who adore spending a nice deal of their time outdoors. Keep that in mind; they have a female elegance and entrance to them which is very attractive to the eye. While the design and outlook of the Sugarpine boots have a shiny and womanly look, the boots also provide noteworthy quality and sturdiness in terms of action. The resources used in the manufacturing of the boot are intended to deliver sporty elasticity in the forefoot. Trekkers will mostly relish taking on rough tracks with the Sugarpine boots on, thanks to the double-thick EVA outsole, which once more delivers a lightweight and sporty feel, while also offering nice grip. In essence, complete with a fashionable structure, air-circulated and waterproof competences and exceptional care, these boots are a must-have if you`re searching for better outlook and feel great on your outside quests​. Specifications Product Dimensions 12 x 8 x 4 inches Item Model Numbe Sugarpine Boot WP-W Weight 1 lb. 7.4 oz. Color Dark Slate, Blue Spell, Mulch, Dark Grey Material Mesh, leather, and suede Suitable for Hiking Pros Made in USA Rubber sole Waterproof hiking shoes Safe lace-up vamp Comfortable padded collar with pull-on loop Numentum Technology for effective, steady pace Ankle care and steadiness Padded, gusseted tongue TPU stability heel clip Rubber toe protector Dual-density EVA, Non-marking Vibram outsole Self-cleaning lugs Cons Not the best choice for backpacking Cannot depend on hard hiking Common Questions and Answers Question : What is the difference between Montana and the Sugarpine boot? Answer : I own both of these styles, and both are very comfortable, excellent quality, and waterproof. But there are some differences. The Montara is mostly leather, and the Sugarpine is mostly heavy-duty nylon. The Montara is more suitable for city walking and has a more dress/casual entrance. The Sugarpine is certainly more casual, both in design and feel. They are lighter in weight than the Montara and have a more rocker-like performance too. Better for walking on the bumpy ground. Question : Do these boots have a good amount of ankle support? I feel like I am always rolling my ankles and want to have extra protection from injury. Answer : I find them to be very supportive! I now wear them year-round, because I roll and sprain my ankles all the time. I wear them on my daily 5-mile hikes in a wooded, hilly state park. knock on wood, but I have not rolled them at all since I started with these shoes about 6 years ago. It's a little lighter and more breathable for the summer. Our Remarks The Ahnu sugarpine hiking boot is a water-resistant mid hiking boot for beating the tracks, day or night. Ahnu has it’s very own water-resistant/air-circulated skill preserves the wet out and keep the toes dry, so clammy, muddy trails won't be a trouble, and a slight rain won't upset either. The mesh, leather, and suede higher grips up against scrape and filth, and a gusseted tongue preserve debris out. Down at the lower side, you'll find a Vibram® outsole with grippy, self-cleaning lugs that will bite into the trails to push you onward with comfort. Concealed at the insole is a combined nylon shaft and a shock dispersal plate for sufficient care and defense contrary to bumpy, less than ideal trail circumstances though some users defined it’s not comfortable for hard hiking. However, with additional care at the ankle, this mid will see you through many miles. Buy on Amazon 2 Clorts Women's Hiker Leather Women’s Hiking Boots Editor Rating : 4.3 out of 5 star Check Price on Amazon! The brand “Clorts” is the mixture of "Mounting" and "Athlete," which focusses on the invention and examination of open-air boots. Clorts was officially founded in 2006 as an all-season outdoor boots corporation and is determined to make the appropriate boots for the outdoor devotees. Clorts Women’s Hiker Leather Women’s Hiking Bootss are fashionable, contented, and sturdy. They are all-season outdoor footwear with the upper substantial being manufactured with suede oxford fabric with a slip-proof and scrape resistant latex outsole. These hiking boots featuring Uneebtex water-resistant casing and defensive toe cover. Rubber toe cap provides an awesome safety and sturdiness and makes walking cozier with keeping your feet dry. Whether on wet gravels, or croaky and sand covered rocks. These shoes do run a little small, so it is suggested that you purchase them a full size up from whatsoever your normal size is. Specifications Model Number HKM-823-W Size US 5, US 6.5, US 7, US 7.5, US 8.5, US 9 Color Dark Grey Pink, Grey Lake Blue, Khaki Brand Clorets Material Mesh, suede leather Pros 60% leather and 40% mesh materials Suede Oxford textile Waterproof lining Skid-proof Abrasion-resistant rubber outside Sanitized actifresh technology Shock-absorbing EVA Cons These hiking boots are too narrow for some users They are not intended for wide or extra wide feet shapes Common Questions and Answers Question : Are this shoe good for cold weather? in going to Iceland & I am afraid it will be too cold to wear it. Answer : With heavy socks maybe. For that kind of cold look for the temperature rating on the boots. I find these are good for mucking around, hiking in moderate weather. However, I think they'd be warm enough for Iceland. As the manufacturer says, “this hiking boots could wear to cold weather.” Question : Are these really waterproof? Answer : Yes, of course, if we are talking about your regular rain, or hiking trips, very comfortable and you feel your toes are well protected against normal weather elements. do not recommend for severe cold winter days for obvious reasons hope this is helpful. Our Remarks The Clorts Women's Hiker Leather Review Read Full is a mid-height hiking boot can be purchased at a reasonable charge. It comes with a uneebtex waterproof casing and a combination of suede and meshes on the higher part of the shoe. "The Clorts Women" 's Hiker Leather "Review Read Full" provides the best of both worlds when it arrives at breathability and sturdiness. This hiking boot comprises a solidity molded EVA midsole for supreme durability. There is also a branded actifresh insole that pushes bacteria gone for fresh or new feet and socks. The rubber outsole may not be as multifaceted or complex as a Vibram sole. However, it seems durable and proficient in delivering outstanding power on any ground. In spite of the low price of the Clorts Women's Hiker Leather Review Read Full, this hiking shoe is very extremely reviewed. This generates the impression that Clorts has originated the ideal balance between affordability and eminence. Buy on Amazon 3 Danner Women's Mountain Light Cascade Hiking Boot Editor Rating : 4.3 out of 5 star Check Price on Amazon! These customary style light hiking boots are ideal for thoughtful hikers, but similarly are fashionable enough to wear out & about informally. The boots are intended to captivate dampness with the Dri-Lex methodical material inside, plus with their fast ventilation abilities are perfect for hiking warm & hot states. Not only they have an extremely iconic elegance; these standard leather hiking boots have a one-piece leather structure, mostly around the tongue provides reduce water or dirt intake. A heavy-duty latex composite, Vibram, makes up the sole, offering vivid shock captivation and nice power and constancy. The leather is attractive and lenient, not rigid and solid to break in. The shaft and upper ankle provision are reinforced so that might take a few short treks to relax up. If you agonize with bunions or have wider feet, go on over & have a look at this hiking boot guide which compares the best of women’s wide hiking boots. Specifications Product Dimensions 7 x 14 x 16 inches "Item Model Numbe" Mountain Light Cascade-W Weight 1190 grams Color Brown, Cascade Material Leather, Rubber Sole Pros Made in us Shaft measures about 5" from arch Heel measures around 1.25 inches" Handcrafted stitch down building to deliver a wider platform Offers amplified constancy underfoot Sienna cache leather has subtle color variations An antiqued effect that patinas gorgeously over time Dri-lex lining offers amplified breathability and ease Retro one-piece leather upper Shank-fiberglass Cons Long break-in period may be needed Boots are heavy in relative terms Does not come with an insole Common Questions and Answers Question : How did your boots fit at first, mine has minimal toe space, no slippage, next size up has heel slippage, more room in the toe box? Answer : Mine and my daughter's fit perfectly but we have narrow feet. Some websites said to get a .5 size up; some say not to. I think if you have wider feet, you should go .5 size up. They are meant to wear with thicker socks. Question : Are these actually waterproof? The website says no; others claim it keeps them dry in water and snow. Answer : I would agree with the Danner website that they are not waterproof. They do a great job protecting your feet from the elements but they are leather, and they are breathable so your feet would get wet eventually. But, to some extent, it is water resistant. Our Remarks Danner Mountain Light Cascade Hiking Boots are intended to be similar to an iconic hiking design that many trusts to be the finest backpacking boot in the past. These Women's Hiking Boots from Danner are manufactured with tough Sienna Cache Leather that appears better the longer you wear them. This Hiker’s boot comes with a single-piece leather upper part to remove holes in the tongue part and keep wreckage out. With Dri-Lex liner to fight smells and fungus, the air-circulated Danner Mountain Light Cascade Women's Hiking Boots have to be worn to be believed. Buy on Amazon 4 Dr comfort hiking boots Editor Rating : 4.4 out of 5 star Check Price on Amazon! The Dr. Comfort Vigor is a tremendously lightweight, fashionable trekker for your open-air journeys. Obtainable with exclusive no-tie Flexible Laces and a Velcro Belt. Elegances to meet all your requirements. For those searching for extra ease and space, try this stretch Lycra design. For those searching for the outdoor quest, this Vigor hiker boot delivers the finest in ease. With top class resources, Dr. Comfort shoes feature the best quality top grain leather uppers, which form to the feet for additional ease and deliver air-circulation. The Lycra and Mesh resources for excellent shoe elegances are also of the optimum quality. The top-quality resources and building also assist to stop wear and tear and make for a lengthier lasting shoe. Leather Lining Leather lining in most of Dr. Comfort shoe assists to keep your feet dry and cool. Even leather coatings also aid to avoid any wounds produced by rubbing against sews. Lastly, an enormously lightweight, fashionable walker for your outdoor or indoor ventures. Obtainable in a Velcro finish with an exclusive no-tie flexible lace. Specifications Model Number 2500 Size 4.0 - 12.0 Color Chestnut, Black Material Leather Extra depth 7/16" Pros Leather with no-tie elastic lacing Velcro Closure Lightweight Excellent arch support Excellent cushion for superior comfort Lightly padded for extra comfort Cons Tight in the toe The tread is not suitable knees hurt and there is not enough room to add an insert that may help Common Questions and Answers Question : How do these run size wise? Answer : They run true to size. They are meant to wear with socks, so they fit properly. I love mine. They are really sturdy and comfy with ankle support. I wear7 1/2 they fit perfectly. Probably the first pair of shoes I have taken out of the box put on and wore nonstop, they are soft leather, but have arch support which I badly need. I love them. Question : Has anyone who has purchased these boots hiked a mountain with boulders? Wondering if the soles are slippery. Answer : Also, I wear mine all year, I've never slipped on snow or in the rain. I do loads of walking. I bought these rights before my trip. Happy to say that even climbing slippery steep rock stairs and rocky steep hills, I had NO pain, no slipping at all. Our Remarks This iconic work boot has been reinvented, sufficiently rough for all your open-air hiking, yet durable, informal and fashionable for work, the Dr. Comfort® Vigor is a contented hiking boot offering constancy and ease. Intended with full top-grain leather, the Vigor comes with a padded heel cup and tongue assisting in defending your feet from skin annoyance and uneasiness. Plus, our exclusive no-tie elastic lace scheme helps makes this hiking boot comfortable to put on. Light and contented, the Vigor has got you protected whether you’re on your feet for work or searching outdoor adventures. We hope the Vigor will renovate their model with much lighter weight. Buy on Amazon 5 Merrell Moab FST Review Read Full Editor Rating : 4.4 out of 5 star Check Price on Amazon! The shoes fit well at the sides, with the additional area at the toe box. The midsole of the shoes is very contented, light and not rigid, thanks to the FIT.ECO mixed EVA footbed as well as moulded nylon arch shaft. The Vibram® MegaGrip expertise at the outsoles permits to have nice adhesion on any ground: soil, grits, stones, wooden walkways, dry or damp. Vibram MegaGrip outsole offers the finest mixture of stickiness and sturdiness. They were contented from the initial wear, with no 'breaking in' period. You can wear them for treks around the neighborhood and forestry tracks. During the time with these shoes, your ankles will be well cared. You didn’t have to concern about twisting your ankle while jumping from one rough ground to another. The mid-height shaft also prohibited wreckage and filth from entering them into the inside of the boots. They are water-resistant and great in mud. They are very light, thus making them impeccable for day hiking and track running. Moreover, you don’t have to concern about crossing shallow water streams during your trail quest; the waterproof casing will take care of it. Specifications Model Number MOAB FST MID WTPF-W Weight 738g (pair) Size 5-11 US Color Boulder, Granite, Black/Teal Material Leather/Fabric Suitable for Hiking Pros Imported Rubber sole Shaft measures approximately 4" from arch Mid-cut hiking shoe with leather, mesh, Tpu upper materials Traditional lace closure Bellows' tongue keeps debris out Breathable mesh lining The finest mixture of stickiness and sturdiness Cons Water resistant level is not satisfactory Quite narrow Common Questions and Answers Question : Would this be an upright shoe to stand 8 hours in? Answer : Yes. Obviously, you can stand more than 8 hours in. This is very lightweight and durable. The FST has an efficient sporty designing and a lighter midsole with the same nice out-of-the-box fitting you assume from Moab. With this weight and high grip, you don’t have to concern about standing more that than 8 hours in. I have hiked for 8+ hours/day without any difficulties or issues. Overall a very contented shoe and I wouldn't hesitate to buy them again. Question : Are the sizes listed women's sizes since they're women's shoes or does the (M) mean men's sizes? Answer : Looking at the sizes part if the description, for example, you see 7B (M), it means medium width. (N) means narrow width and (W) means wide width. This goes for both men’s and women’s shoes. Our Remarks Merrell Moab FST Review Read Full is an ordinary hiking boot for the exploratory. It offers all-day ease in a rough land with the great out of the box fitting you assume from Moab but with rationalized sporty designing and a lighter midsole. The top-quality includes M Select™ DRY for air-circulation, waterproofness and a Vibram® MegaGrip outsole for certain adhesion on the damp and dry ground. The Merrell Moab FST Review Read Full provides all-day ease on the track. Some argued about the resistant level with this boot. However, the waterproof lining will certainly preserve feet dry through any terrain. Buy on Amazon 6 Merrell Women's Moab 2 Vent Mid Hiking Boot Editor Rating : 4.8 out of 5 star Check Price on Amazon! A very widespread pair of hiking boots that have been everywhere for quite a while. They're much respected, and with decent cause, they are an efficient and contented pair of light hiking boots. Merrell is a very well-known product in the open-air equipment world. They have a past of manufacturing top-class boots, and many of their items have truly stood the test of time over the years. Well, we always look at the parts of the hiking boots as well as functionality. So, starting with these boot’s design seems like a good thing to begin. In relations with coziness, the boots arrive with full-length, solidity-molded EVA midsoles which supply lessening and care for all-day wear. An ideal example of a day hike boot. After being out on the track all day, you will obviously sweat so the detachable 4.5mm footbeds are convenient to let the soles and innards of the boots breathe after some use. The footbeds are also structurally designed and additional cushioning for the better ease, they're manufactured particularly to fit feet. That Merrell Women's Moab 2 Vent Mid Hiking Boots breathe very well, always much-needed equipment on the track, particularly in brighter climates and times of the year. Specifications Model Number MOAB 2 VENT MID-W Weight 1lb 14oz / 844G Size 5.5 – 14 US Color Bracken/Purple, Taupe Material Leather and Textile Suitable for Hiking Pros Leather and Textile Imported Synthetic sole Breathable mesh lining.5mm lug depth Suede leather and mesh upper Closed-cell foam tongue retains or keeps moisture and debris out Vibram TC5+ sole Cons Not suitable for small feet A bit too warm for the climate Common Questions and Answers Question : How's the ankle support? Answer : Ankle support of this boots is amazing. They just come up a little higher than hiking sneakers. But otherwise, the boots are great. Comfortable and light, I wear them to work every day and am on my third pair. They last over a year for me. Question : How long are the laces? Answer : They are long enough to lace all the way up and make a bow. If you want to wrap them around, you probably could but would be tough going to tie a bow. With the laces, all laced in you have about 9 inches of lace to tie your bow. Plenty of lace. Great boot. You will absolutely love them. Our Remarks The Moab Ventilator hiking boots are attractively reasonable priced coming in at lower end of the mod range for hiking boots in this quality. A very widespread pair of hiking boots that have been around for quite a while. Though they are not waterproof, they're much loved, and with decent cause, they are an efficient and relaxed pair of lightweight hiking boots. Lastly, in terms of coziness, the boots have heel loops that can be used to aid you to put your boots on when you're getting started, always convenient to get a comfortable fit! Buy on Amazon 7 Merrell Women's Siren Edge Hiker Editor Rating : 4.5 out of 5 star Check Price on Amazon! Merrell personalized the outline of the Siren Edge for women as a crossover of sporty and hiking boots. Its straight-out-of-the-box ease, no break-in period and true-to-size fitting were undisputable. A substantial number of customers were persuaded that receiving the second pair is worth it with its persistent luxury and care. Its grippy outsole is also very appreciable. As ideal as these hiking boots may appear, it also achieved the quality Merrell has been known for. In addition to, Merrell Siren Edge is still a go-to shoe from everyday tasks to light hiking in the tracks. Merrell assurances that the Siren Edge is fortified with qualities that are perfect for long hikes and can keep the feet relaxed. The mesh upper with 3D print mesh overlaps provides an air-circulated mixture. The bellows tongue stops debris from entering the shoe. A Merrell-patented footbed with smell control, the M.Select FIT.ECO, holds the freshness of the shoes and delivers easiness. Moreover, the EVA midsole preserves the foot cushioned. The heel reinforcement and formed nylon arch shaft alleviate and offer a safe foothold on grounds. Specifications Product Dimensions 5 x 5 x 0.7 inches Item Model Numbe J35516 Weight 570g Size 5- 11 US Color 13 different color available Material Mesh Pros Mesh Imported Vibram sole Athletically styled hiker Breathable mesh lining Molded nylon arch shank Bellows tongue to keep out debris Organic odor control Absorbs shock and adds stability Shock-absorbing air cushion heel Vibram traction outsole Cons Started to show signs of wear after some heavy use lack of cushioning on the heel Not waterproof Common Questions and Answers Question : I wear an 8.5 shoe and a 9 or 9.5 sneaker. What size should I get? Answer : They are true to size. They are wide from the front. You can always exchange, and I think these are on amazon wardrobe so you can order several and return the ones that don’t fit. I wear a 5.5 sneaker and bought this shoe in a 6 because of the thick hiking socks I wear with them. The extra half size is exactly what you want if you are wearing hiking socks with them. In your case, you might want to get them in a 9.5. Hope this helps! Question : Some people say these are waterproof, some don't. I'm guessing there are two different models. How do I know which I am getting? Answer : The ones that are waterproof say that they are. They will have a little flag on the side of the shoes. It also says waterproof in the description of the shoes. If it does not say waterproof in these places, then they are not. This hiking boot is not waterproof though some people say this because of its high-water-resistant level. Our Remarks The "Merrell Siren Edge" brought a right-out-of-the-box coziness. Not only some user complains about the quality of this product, but also this was appreciated by many based on their optimistic reviews. One said that she felt like the shoes were made for her. This pair was one of the most contented hiking boots ever, as stated by a noteworthy number of wearers. A considerable number of Siren Edge buyers praised the Vibram outsole. They said that it was able to grip well on muddy and concrete lands. Buy on Amazon 8 Mishmi Takin Review Read Full Editor Rating : 4.5 out of 5 star Check Price on Amazon! The event casing expertise that Mishmi Takin Review Read Full has nailed with is based on millions of narrow pores that scatter any backlog of vapour within seconds in instead of a slow 4-step (condensation, absorption, dispersion, ventilation) procedure that exists in most hiking boots intended for safety in the rain. The membrane expertise is also water-resistant, so the boot suits a wide range of circumstances. After hours of hiking over wet, muddy and damp woodland part in the Alps, you don’t have to alter to an extra pair of socks. Mishmi Takin Review Read Full has a black scratch resistant heel cap. All about is a rubber toe rand for extra foot safety. In the front, there is a black rubber toe bumper stand-in as a stone protector. Enhanced for long hiking, backpacking or shooting in wet & tough conditions, Kameng is a solidly constructed boot. A 'NO COMPROMISE PRODUCT' manufactured for enthusiastic outdoorsmen & women, fed up with poor-quality boots from big brands. Kameng’s grip provides you peace of mind. Vibram Mega grip rubber allows greater grip on wet surfaces. Moreover, high profile Vibram Gironda outsole delivers constancy on rocks. Specifications Weight 630g Size 6-13.5 Color Grey, Moss Green, Sunset Orange Material Leather Resistant level Waterproof Pros Made in Europe Vibram mega grip sole Optimized for long distance hiking Kameng is a solidly built boot Quick drying 100 % waterproof Air permeable event membrane Has superb breathability Best grip in town Vibram mega grip rubber Superior traction on wet surfaces Durable & comfortable out of the box Cons The arch is inadequate Not comfortable if you are a hard hiker Disappointing shoestring loops though boots are durable Common Questions and Answers Question : I don't see any women's size 7. Do they not have this size? is there a different comparable size? Answer : The sizing is European, and there is no exact match with women's 7. Kameng is slightly on the bigger side, so for US Women's 7, the best fit is likely to be EU 37. However, if you usually wear 7 or 7.5 (i.e., you are slightly bigger than size 7), then go with EU 38. Hope that helps. Question : What is the difference between the Kameng and the Jampui? Answer : The major difference between Kameng and Jampui is that Kameng has a stiffer sole describe as similar to Jampui. This makes Kameng more convenient for the times while you have heavier tons or loads on your back. Jampui is also about 7-oz lighter or well-lit than Kameng. Along with the somewhat more flexible sole, Jampui is better suited for day hikes and in city use. Our Remarks Born to survive fickle Himalayan climate & land, Kameng is the choice for rough treks and backpacking tours when you require the finest. Kameng is enhanced for a long period of hiking and backpacking in damp & treacherous circumstances. Mishmi Takin boots emphasis on improved user relief by make the most of air exchange among the inside of the gear and the outside. This ventilation-focused product structure, highly air-circulated, air penetrable event fabrics, and Vibram Mega grip rubber provide this Footwear enough power to preserve you contented in hot, cold, moist, damp, or any WET circumstances. However, we hope that the manufacturer will be more focused on the shoestring loops to make it even better. Buy on Amazon 9 Nevados Women's Klondike Full Review Check Editor Rating : 4 out of 5 star Check Price on Amazon! It is a modest, contented, and reasonable boot. A nice selection for dedicated trekkers, backpackers and light packers alike. The present drift embraces lighter resources that still provide great care, and tackle damp and gravelly tracks. This hiking boots surely attain that. The upper comprises suede leather, that’s manufactured to last long, and waterproof nylon mesh. It has a rough carbon rubber cup sole, no curiosity for why no one loses grip with this boot on. In addition to the above action, this hiking boot is amazingly beautiful and rough bearing in mind the sensible price tag and is worth totaling to your cart. Tough Women's Nevados Klondike "Full Review Check" s are very affordable! They're totally water-resistant from the ground up; seam-sealed design, plus water-resistant leather to beat back dampness. You'll adore the comfortable inner, that boasts a padded insole and EVA midsole to buffer in contradiction of impact. For top-end grip, a rubber outsole grips the ground underneath so you won't slip and slide when circumstances get a bit "risky." The sure-footed security confirms with the leather and meshes nylon uppers, which are waterproof and air-circulated for ease. Great liner generates a comfortable, dry inner; Padded tongue and lapel for a soft feel inside the shoe; Toe and heel bumper assist in preserving your feet harmless in harsh circumstances. Specifications Product Dimensions 10 x 3 x 5 inches Item Model Numbe Klondike WP V1173W-W Size 5-11 US Color Brown/Black Taupe, Brown/Chestnut/Aqua, Brown/Chestnut/Aqua Material Leather-and-fabric Water resistance Waterproof Pros Imported Rubber sole Shaft measures approximately 5" from arch waterproof bootie construction Molded Eva and brushed nylon sock liner Carbon rubber cup sole the boots have a great price for the quality they have the boots remain dry and keep away the elements all day long the boots are sturdy Cons They tend to feel heavy weight after a while when hiking The shaft is quite big Common Questions and Answers Question : I walk 4 miles daily and need warmth. are the boots warm? Answer : They are warm and seem to be waterproof although you do not have to stand in water to test this. You can hike where you need to cross streams, and your feet will stay dry. Even in the snow, your feet will dry from walking the dog in the morning. Question : I live in Az, and the summers are hot will these be too warm? Answer : These are my "summer" mountain boots. Sock thickness would be the key. They should be good for hot or cold weather. I recommend breathable socks to avoid moist. In cold weather, you should use wool or alpaca socks with them. Our Remarks The Nevados Women's Klondike Full Review Check is a typical mid-cut climbing boot manufactured with water-resistant suede leather that delivers some thoughtful care. The midsole is a solidity molded EVA foam with brushed nylon mesh sock liner, and the outsole is a TPR cup sole with track-prepared grip. It has fast pull lacing and padding at the tongue and lapel for a cushioned touch though the shaft is quite big. Rocky outdoor actions meet eminence, ease and worth in Nevados boots and shoes for the entire family. This company is the top manufacturer of hiking and open-air boot, Nevados takes its motivation from nature, with great rough constructed to take on any challenge. Buy on Amazon 10 The First Outdoor Women's Full Review Checks Editor Rating : 4.3 out of 5 star Check Price on Amazon! These are an all-around great shoe. They are remarkably padded, needed very little time to break in. With top-class Fourth Dynasties First-Tex water-resistant socks inside shoes and on the external of shoes, have Chemical water-resistant paint-layer, to ensure the high and sturdy waterproof action. They are lightweight on the bases while still delivering the backing and coziness of a more heavy-duty boot. This is a nice selection for an all-season hiking boot that is contented, water-resistant, and air-circulated. This hiking boot arrives with a toe-heel solid defensive film which allows you the crash-proof play, also stopping bugs and snakes bite at the same time. These qualities make it one of the best women’s hiking boots. Top class flexible and contented sponge is placed around the neck which makes it warmer and more comfortable. Using breathable insole to preserves the air in your shoes to make it fresh and alleviate for your foot fatigue. At the same time, the airbag also has shock captivation result. Air circulation insole allows each pair of your shoes as comfortable as air max shoes when you wear. Specifications Size 5-9.5 US Color Black Upper Material Genuine Leather Insole Material EVA Lining Material Synthetic Outsole Material Rubber Feature Breathable, Waterproof Closure Type Lace-Up Pros Rubber sole High-tech "Fourth Dynasties First" -Tex Have Chemical waterproof paint-coat High strong waterproof function Toe heel hard protective film A best first layer of cowering leather for shoe Vamp Aircraft tire rubber compound outsole Comfort bending resistance Slip-wear resistance Made with breathable, waterproof fabric Cons The shaft is too much long Not suitable for small foot Too warm Common Questions and Answers Question : Is it worthy enough to gift someone? Answer : Obviously, this Fourth-generation waterproof hiking boot can b a perfect gift for your preferred ones. These shoes are made of air-circulated and water-resistant fabric. These top-class boots are as appreciated for the quality. As they are for hikers and avid outdoor adventurers. Question : How heavy is this shoe? Answer : it is easy to walk in and has a sole that is the heaviest part of the shoe. I would say it is a great walking shoe. I am not a hiker, but I think it would work very well in that aspect. It’s pretty light considering it’s a hiking shoe and waterproof! A little heavy than tennis shoes but not bad at all. Hope this helps. Our Remarks 4 th generation water-resistant and air-circulated film in shoe’s water-resistant socks, trade with First-Tex, each pair of shoes approved texting. Moreover, on the surface of shoes, it has chemical water-resistant paint-layer, to ensure top class and sturdy waterproof feature. These boots are manufactured with air circulated and water-resistant material; these duty boots are as valuable for service members as they are for hikers and avid open-air explorers though some users complain about their long shaft. This ultra-breathable outdoor shoe is ideal for super dry and could easily use as your pair of sneakers for the trip. The outsole is intended to grip on the diverse land, and the light upper is nice for summer hiking. Buy on Amazon What To "Know Before Buying" The Product? Selecting the correct hiking boots is kind of a matchmaking process. Your dream hiking boots required to synchronize with how and where you hike. Before you draw or tie the knot, though, you also have to ensure that they’re an ideal fit. We’ve prepared a checklist below: Things You Cannot Ignore Types There are, all things considered, three kinds of footwear intended precisely for hiking. While many variations of "work boots" work ok for day hiking, when you use a devoted hiking boot, you'll wonder why you ever used a large, old, weighty work boot. Naturally, a good day hiking boot will deliver hard ankle care - so solid that you can't roll over the ankle while standing in them - counting when you wear a light pack. Backpacking boots are the large, heavy hitters of the boot world. Backpacking boots are precisely intended to deliver complete rock-solid ankle care, even when you are carrying a pack that weighs more than 50 pounds. And the other types are best hiking shoes for women, these are fine shoes for around town stuff, informal and extended walks in local parks, around town and over flatter parts where the ground is even. Ideal Fit As not all feet suitable to standard foot sizes, you may find that your feet need a custom insole, which can enhance up to total half size, to achieve the ideal fit. Insoles can also be serving a useful function if you have low or collapsed arches, can help if one foot is longer than the other, or if you find your heel slipping. Finally, remember: the better the shoe fits, the better the technology will work to protect you on your adventure. Test-walk your boots Don't be shy about walking around in hiking boots right before purchase. Test-walk is very important while you purchase a new one. If you are a buyer from online, don’t worry virtually all online merchants (unlike most brick and mortar stores, for whatever reason) permit returns of hiking boots if they don't clearly beat up. Styles Choose your boots relying on the ground you will hike on and the weights you assume to transport. Since additional weights on your feet essentially take their toll in terms of energy spending by the dusk, you need to go for the lightweight boots so you can go for your adventures with ease. Digging Deep into Technicalities Waterproof or non-waterproof If you are preparing to hike in the rain or cross lots of watercourses in casual or cold circumstances, consider purchasing water-resistant boots. But, keep that in mind waterproof boots can feel miserable when it’s warm and moist. A waterproof casing will trap warm air and moisture around your feet, which can cause sores, itches on the skin. Moreover, in hot, dry areas, a water-resistant boot will make your feet warmer. So, think about the circumstances you’ll face mostly during your hiking. Be materialistic In the matter of hiking boots, the material is the most vital thing to consider before buying. The incorrect material can make your feet warm, painful and cramped. Find the accurate material for an ultimate comfortable hike. When it comes to the synthetic, in this category are often nylon and polyester. They are relaxed to break in, feel lightweight, and dry quickly when damp, but are not as much of waterproof. When we consider about Split-grain leather, they are often manufactured with half leather half synthetics; this material is still very air-circulated. Lastly, when we arrive at full grain leather, most hiking boots are manufactured with full-grain leather. It's a very sturdy substance, ideal for hard hikers planning to cross unsteady ground. From another viewpoint, this material is less air-circulated and quite heavier than the others. Different Cuts Mountaineering boots arrive in all dissimilar cuts, and this should particularly custom-made to your kind of hiking—the incorrect cut could cause a twisted ankle or rocks in your boots. Low-cut boots are comparable to running shoes. While they are ideal for light, informal hiking, this cut leaves you vulnerable to ankle wounds. Mid-cut provides more ankle care and stability, as well as an improved cushion from debris along the track. High-cut with the best stability and ankle care, this cut is finest for the hard hiker who is going on and off the trail, and traversing possibly risky ground. Remembering the Extras Delivery Hiking boots are crucial equipment, so its essential to ask about the delivery procedure and about how they handle the product. Likewise, you need to check appropriately if there are any additional hidden cost added to your delivery process. Return Policy It's highly recommended to look at the store’s return policy to see if there are any additional cost to send in back to the manufacturer or seller when you don’t like the boots or want to return it back. If you are an online buyer, then be careful about their shipping procedure. Warranties When you are purchasing something from online, warranty is the most important thing to consider before making the final payment. Because you can not test the product, that’s why u cannot be sure about the quality or the features you have been looking for. How to Use and Maintain the Product? Safety features You need to make sure about the safety feature of your boots. There is not that much safety feature included with a hiking boot. You need to check if there are strong grip available so that you don’t slip in the clumsy or slippery area. Maintenance If it is conceivable, you must look for best women’s hiking boots that you don’t have to maintain frequently. Usually, leather and sturdy structured boots have that quality included. Hiking boot maintenance Cleaning You need to take out the laces, and brush off any dirt or mud with a brush that is much softer. If the sole of your boots has filled with mud, use a brush with tough spikes. Spray on boot cleaner from a 10-15cm remoteness, then rub it off with fresh damp cloth or sponge. Let them dry naturally, or put on some additional defense while still moist. Check the overall condition When you are keeping your boots away for later use, check with the same basics that you have checked before. In specific, substitute unraveling ties, moveable grommets or D-rings, and damaged inner soles. At the very slightest, put spare substances down on your "must-buys" for the following visit to the hiking boot shop so that you'll have the objects earlier your following trek. Store your hiking boots However, hiking boots don't have a habit of to be used throughout the whole year around by most people, find an appropriate storing space that is out of the way but still effortlessly nearby when required. Avoid moist storing, or you may have difficulties with mildew growing. A shoe tree is the finest place for packing them for long-term. Warranty Best women’s hiking boots could be manufactured with leather, synthetic or semi leather-synthetic materials. Most of the high-class hiking boots provide a one-year warranty on the service. Make sure whether the warranty covers the components too. Attention! If you are purchasing the product from a retails store or over the online store, look for a clarification that does the seller has their own service provider staff. If not, then know details about the manufacturer warranty and where and how to send them for warranty. Final Verdict It very hard to choose from light day walkers to heavy-duty boots for serious backpacking. Finding the ideal fit is grave, but elegance, sturdiness, heat, weight, and even water resistance are all serious thoughts. You must also pay consideration to the substantial, footstep pattern, and the tallness of the rise on the pair of boots you buy since all of those issues are key to ease and realism. After reading the whole article, if you are still confused about which one to buy, then we are here to assist you with that specific selection. We will start with the finest one. The Danner Women's Mountain Light Cascade Hiking Boot & Mishmi Takin Kameng Mid Event Full Review Check are the most durable one in our list. While both of them are manufactured from leather, and you can guess the consequences! Yes, both of them are waterproof too. A lot of people provide optimistic reviews for Ahnu Women's Sugarpine Hiking Boot and Merrell Women's Siren Edge Hiker for their lightweight and affordability. While the first one is the US made and the other one is an imported product. Both of them are very breathable and have sturdy construction and fashionable design. Other options like Dr. Comfort Vigor Women's Therapeutic Diabetic Extra Depth Hiking Boot Leather Lace and The First Outdoor Women’s Full Review Checks are good for those who want leather boots with more affordability. We’ve reached the final stage of our article, and finally, we highly recommend you to go through our article more preciously if you still have any confusion. Take one last look before jumping to your perception about best women’s hiking boots. Try to comprehend the flexibility and dissimilar drive and the value difference among the list. We hope for your best! Happy Shopping! share share share share share

Summary

There have been many times I asked myself this question: If I survived a holocaust of some sort — like say a zombie apocalypse or a nuclear fallout — and there was only one semi-auto handgun caliber left in the world, what would that be for me? Would I pick the 9mm because there might be stockpiles of ammo left everywhere? Would I settle for the . 380 acp which, with its really low SAAMI pressure limit, shouldn’t be to difficult to build a gun for as I could just use junk metal pipes? Would I pick the 10mm for its . 41 magnum ballistics, and for the possibility of setting up a great dual-caliber system in the Glock 20 (because I could use .